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October 11, 2011

Americans love to shoot secret smartphone videos: report

A Harris Interactive survey of more than 2,300 adults showed that 50 percent of American adults would use a smartphone to take a secret video.

The top targets?

• 23% - people in embarrassing outfits
• 20% - athletes at a sporting event
• 15% - someone tripping/falling
• 10% - sexy waitress at a restaurant
• 9% - shirtless hunk mowing the neighbor’s lawn
• 7% - cheerleaders
• 7% - boss or coworker sneaking a second doughnut
• 6% - disgusting grooming habits
• 5% - couple kissing or making out
• 8%- other

Stay classy, America!

For the full press release on the survey, hit the jump:

Qumu Survey: 50% of Americans Say They Would Use Smartphones to Take Secret Videos
Secretly recording people in embarrassing outfits was #1 choice

A majority of Americans think it would be funny or interesting if videos were shared at work

CTIA CONFERENCE, San Diego, Calif. Booth #1022 — October 12, 2011 – Qumu, www.qumu.com, the leading business video platform provider, today announced the findings of its September 2011 survey of 2,361 Americans aged 18 and older, conducted online by Harris Interactive. The survey, which was drafted based on Qumu’s experience in mobile and tablet use in the workplace, discovered that 50% of Americans would use a smartphone to take a secret video. When asked which scenarios, if any, would Americans choose to record secretly, they revealed:

• 23% - people in embarrassing outfits
• 20% - athletes at a sporting event
• 15% - someone tripping/falling
• 10% - sexy waitress at a restaurant
• 9% - shirtless hunk mowing the neighbor’s lawn
• 7% - cheerleaders
• 7% - boss or coworker sneaking a second doughnut
• 6% - disgusting grooming habits
• 5% - couple kissing or making out
• 8%- other

A majority of Americans (57%) say they would find it funny or interesting if a coworker was to share, upload, or post online a video in the workplace (e.g., on the company intranet or on the company shared files server). The number one video Americans might find funny or interesting if posted is of someone pulling a prank on a co-worker (30%), followed by someone imitating the boss (27%), a high-level executive being forced to make coffee (23%), someone napping on the job (21%), co-workers fooling around while thinking no one is watching (13%), a company party ending in inappropriate behavior (12%) and someone “pigging out” in the workplace kitchen (11%).

Men are more likely to find any videos of these types of activities more funny or interesting than women (60% vs. 54%); especially those between the ages of 18-34 (25%) when it came to videos of co-workers fooling around while thinking no one was watching.

To help companies adapt to the challenges posed by video, social media, and mobile use, Qumu is educating the enterprise about enabling video content to be centrally managed and also embedded in virtually any business application, portal or mobile app. The Qumu Video Platform includes both the Video Control Center 6.0 and its sister product VideoNet 2.0. The Qumu Video Platform enables the enterprise to manage, organize and securely distribute live and on-demand video to each desktop and every mobile viewer, such as iPads, iPhones and Android devices.

“While the social aspects of video can be fun for employees and can enhance corporate culture in a positive way, it’s becoming critical for corporations to provide employees with an easy to use video platform that can manage the video sharing process,” said Ray Hood, CEO of Qumu.

“At Qumu we provide the opportunity for employers to better control the way video is shared, organized and distributed to employees. We provide automatic transcoding and an approval process prior to publishing that ensures corporate standards are upheld, as well as reports that show what videos employees are watching. Qumu knows the future of business depends on video being consumed anytime, anywhere – a Video Powered Enterprise means providing the Freedom to work with existing infrastructure; the Power to reach all audiences; and the Control to do it right.”
About Qumu

Qumu, Inc., based in San Bruno, California, is the leading business video platform provider, empowering organizations to better engage and inspire employees, improve productivity, and reduce costs. Video is pervasive – it appears in all business applications and is consumed on all devices. The largest Global 1000 companies depend on Qumu’s video platform to capture, manage, and distribute live and on-demand content with total reliability and security. Regardless of audience size, viewer device, or network configuration, Qumu simply makes video work. Only Qumu delivers the Freedom to work with existing infrastructure; the Power to reach everyone; and the Control to do it right.
Visit www.qumu.com

About Rimage Corporation

Founded in 1978, Rimage Corporation (NASDAQ: RIMG) helps businesses deliver digital content directly and securely to their customers and employees. Its disc publishing business, based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, supplies more than 10,000 customers in North America, Europe and Asia with industry-leading solutions that archive, distribute and protect content on CDs, DVDs and Blu-Ray Discs™. With its acquisition of Qumu, Rimage will become a leader in the rapidly growing enterprise video communications market. The combination of Qumu and Rimage’s disc publishing business and virtual publishing initiative enables businesses to securely deliver their videos, documents, audio files and images in today’s multi-platform, multi-device world. Additional information can be found at www.rimagecorp.com.
Blu-ray Disc™ is a trademark of the Blu-ray Disc Association.

Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive via its QuickQuery omnibus product on behalf of Qumu from September 21-23, 2011, among 2,361 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Curtis Sparrer at Grayling Connecting Point.
All sample surveys and polls, whether or not they use probability sampling, are subject to multiple sources of error which are most often not possible to quantify or estimate, including sampling error, coverage error, error associated with nonresponse, error associated with question wording and response options, and post-survey weighting and adjustments. Therefore, Harris Interactive avoids the words “margin of error” as they are misleading. All that can be calculated are different possible sampling errors with different probabilities for pure, unweighted, random samples with 100% response rates. These are only theoretical because no published polls come close to this ideal.


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Posted by Gus Sentementes at 2:52 PM | | Comments (0)
        

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About Gus G. Sentementes
Gus G. Sentementes (@gussent on Twitter) has been writing for The Baltimore Sun since 2000. He's covered real estate, business, prisons, and suburban and Baltimore City crime and cops. He was one of the first reporters at The Sun to use multimedia tools and Web applications -- a video camera, an iPhone -- to cover breaking news. He hopes to cover Maryland geeks and the gadgets and Web sites they build, and learn -- and share -- something new every day.

Gus has a wife, a young daughter and two feuding cats. They live in Northeast Baltimore.
This is an archived version of the technology blog. For updated coverage, see the current baltTech location: baltimoresun.com/balttech
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