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December 9, 2010

Um, about that 'Christianity Under Attack Business.' Never mind

Looks like Christianity might not be under attack after all. Or if it is, the Metropolitan Baltimore Council of AFL-CIO Unions doesn't care anymore.

As I wrote in my Thursday column, Ernie Grecco, the longtime president of the Baltimore union, sent an official e-mail this week with this in the subject line: "Christianity Under Attack."

"CHRISTIANITY IS UNDER SEVERE ATTACK!!!," it began. "WE MUST TAKE A STAND!!! IF WE DON'T, WE WILL FALL!!!"

What followed was a poem, a spoof on "'Twas the Night Before Christmas" that complains about the commercialization of Christmas and has made the rounds on the Internet for years — long enough for many of the targets to have passed into irrelevance. Here's a bit:

"At K-Mart and Staples and Penny's and Sears / You won't hear the word Christmas; it won't touch your ears / Inclusive, sensitive, Di-ver-is-ty / Are words that were used to intimidate me / Now Daschle, Now Darden, Now Sharpton, Wolf Blitzen / On Boxer, on Rather, on Kerry, on Clinton! / At the top of the Senate, there arose such a clatter / To eliminate Jesus, in all public matter."

I wanted to ask Grecco if getting Christ back into Christmas was an official position of the AFL-CIO, but he didn't return my calls Wednesday. He has since issued a press release on the subject. It reads:

"Earlier today I forwarded a personal e-mail concerning Christmas on the Baltimore AFL-CIO letterhead. It was a personal email and the sentiments expressed in that e-mail do not represent the position of the Baltimore AFL-CIO. I hope you'll accept my apologies."

Posted by Laura Vozzella at 11:36 AM | | Comments (2)
        

Comments

It's ironic that some Christians are so dismayed by the diminishing mention of Jesus and his birthday during the holiday season (as if Christ was Jesus' last name and he was actually born on December 25th).

One could get the idea that frantically spending beyond our means on trivial and forgetful 'gifts', that are bartered for other 'gifts, is the orthodox Christian way to celebrate the birth of a man who owned and wanted for nothing and suggested giving away our money and our non-essentials. Somehow it is a dishonor not to link Jesus with Black Friday?

Of course back in the day, Hutzlers, Hoschild's and Hecht's never had any problem celebrating the Christmas season. But it wasn't exactly for religious reasons.

Maybe the author should try spell check before posting about "Baltimroe" and "Coucnil"

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About the bloggers
Annie Linskey covers state politics and government for The Baltimore Sun. Previously, as a City Hall reporter, she wrote about the corruption trial of Mayor Sheila Dixon and kept a close eye on city spending. Originally from Connecticut, Annie has also lived in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where she reported on war crimes tribunals and landmines. She lives in Canton.

John Fritze has covered politics and government at the local, state and federal levels for more than a decade and is now The Baltimore Sun’s Washington correspondent. He previously wrote about Congress for USA TODAY, where he led coverage of the health care overhaul debate and the 2010 election. A native of Albany, N.Y., he currently lives in Montgomery County.

Julie Scharper covers City Hall and Baltimore politics. A native of Baltimore County, she graduated from The Johns Hopkins University in 2001 and spent two years teaching in Honduras before joining The Baltimore Sun. She has followed the Amish community of Nickel Mines, Pa., in the year after a schoolhouse massacre, reported on courts and crime in Anne Arundel County, and chronicled the unique personalities and places of Baltimore City and its surrounding counties.
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