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December 16, 2009

More than 300 teachers receive national board certification

Maryland added 307 new board-certified teachers to its ranks this year, a 22 percent increase from last year. We now have 1,669 board-certified teachers in the state, about a third of whom are in Montgomery County.

Anne Arundel County, though, which is relatively small compared to others in the metro region, has the second highest number. That county added 48 new teachers this year. The question may be why isn't the city in the game here? The top five school systems in the state based on the number of national board-certified teachers are Montgomery, Anne Arundel, Prince George's, Carroll and Baltimore counties.

The state ranks seventh in the number of board-certified teachers it added this year. and 14th in the nation for the total number. Here is a list of the state's new board certified teachers.

The designation is something of a prize for teachers because it means they have been through a certification process that is far more rigorous than getting a regular teachers certificate. These teachers have to spend a good deal of time and energy on the process, but they are paid extra. The state will match a the salary increase from local school systems up to $1,000, except for teachers who are in high-needs schools. Those teachers will receive up to $2,000 more.

Posted by Liz Bowie at 3:21 PM | | Comments (10)
Categories: Around the Region
        

Comments

"The question may be why isn't the city in the game here?"

Is that really a question we don't already know the answer to? BCPSS treats teachers, new, old, certified, or otherwise with no sense of professionalism or decency. I love my students and get a lot out of my job (personally), but I wouldn't recommend any new teachers work here either.

This city teacher isn't in "the game" because of being overburdened by paperwork. I'm so inundated with writing letters home, special education documentation, planning lessons (my content area lessons, service learning lessons, PBIS lessons), correcting papers, etc. that I barely have time for any thing else. My house is such a mess that I'd be embarrassed if anyone dropped by. I haven't gone out with friends in months. I'm relieved that I've reached the point in my career where I no longer have to take any courses to maintain my certification because I'd have to give up sleep in order to do so. If the city wants its teachers to pursue national board certification, something has to give.

Brandon--I think the real reason is that other districts have financial incentives built in for their teachers to participate. I started the process a few years back but got no support for any of the activities that were required or any type of financial support for all of the money you have to put forth in terms of travel or supplies. Finally, what does the certification get you in the city? No more money; just personal satisfaction--lots of work and essentially you are treated the same way. Why bother?

@veteran teacher

Did you read Liz's post?

"These teachers have to spend a good deal of time and energy on the process, but they are paid extra. The state will match a the salary increase from local school systems up to $1,000, except for teachers who are in high-needs schools. Those teachers will receive up to $2,000 more."

How can you say there's no more money involved when there clearly is? This is of course not to say that the money is why a teacher should do it or that it's worth it for the work you have to put in (I have not gone through the process so I wouldn't be qualified to comment) but to say that there's no monetary compensation is clearly factually incorrect, according to Liz's reporting above.

For what it's worth, I think teachers aren't completing the process because teachers aren't seeing themselves as career teachers so they don't want to go through a rigorous process that costs money up front if they don't think they'll be around long enough to benefit from it. Also, if you've committed to teaching in BCPS and won't be applying to other jobs anytime soon, having this prestigious boost in certification doesn't help you stand out from other applicants for a different position. That's just a guess, though.

@Simon--Yes, I read about the extra money but the people in the city who finished the process took over a year to receive any type of compensation. What does that prove? And, you are correct, only someone who wants to be a career teacher would go through this process and why would they choose to stay in a system that doesn't value career teachers? Just a guess.

Our focus is expanding from individuals achieving National Board Certification to a systemic movement that changes the culture of classrooms, schools and districts by leveraging National Board Certified Teachers to build human capital, especially in high-need schools. This announcement symbolizes what we’re all about—improving the capacity of professionals in working with all student.

Baltimore County Public Schools provides a stipend to teachers to cover the $2,000+ cost of taking the National Board Exam. Beginning this year they are concentrating on giving the stipend only to teachers in Title One schools. I do not think this is fair. It costs over $2,000 to take the exam which is out of reach for most teachers. In addition, Maryland lowered the amount of compensation awarded to teachers to only $1,000 yearly. Montgomery County clearly values their teachers as teaching professionals - thus the number of teachers who are pursuing National Board Certification there. I wish that more counties along with the state would encourage teachers to pursue this high level of professional development by providing exam fees and higher compensation for certification.

A great step in recognizing teachers efficiency in our field..

if you've committed to teaching in BCPS and won't be applying to other jobs anytime soon, thank you and more power!!!

These teachers have to spend a good deal of time and energy on the process, but they are paid extra.

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