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June 15, 2010

Alleged Patterson Park Bloods leader indicted

The alleged leader of a Southeast Baltimore Bloods gang was indicted by a federal grand jury on drugs and weapons charges, federal prosecutors announced.

Kevin Chambers, also known as “BK” and “Kaos,” is alleged to have led a gang called the Rollin’ 20’s Bloods that sold large quantities of crack cocaine and heroin along Fayette Street, around one of the city’s most persistently troubled areas, and in Patterson Park.

The indictment comes about two weeks after two men were shot within an hour in the nearby McElderry Park neighborhood, and two sources told The Sun at the time that the shooting was believed to stem from a dispute between the Rollin’ 20’s Bloods and a group called the Lueders Park Pirus.

"We are pulling out all the stops to accelerate federal violent crime and gang cases in an effort to head off additional shootings this summer and continue to build on the positive momentum of recent years," said U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein in an e-mail.

Court papers allege that Rollin’ 20’s members possessed and distributed firearms and committed acts of violence, including armed robberies and assaults, though it does not detail those incidents.

Chambers, 29, of the 1100 block of N. Milton Ave. faces a maximum sentence of life in prison for drug conspiracy charges and a maximum of 20 years for gun conspiracy charges.

He was indicted May 25 in Baltimore Circuit Court on several drug-related charges. He was convicted on handgun charges in 2007, receiving a suspended sentence and three years probation, and has prior drug convictions.

Posted by Justin Fenton at 6:47 PM | | Comments (2)
Categories: Gangs, Southeast Baltimore
        

Comments

The Feds need to make an example out of this guy. A life sentence is the only thing that will get the attention of other gang members. Maybe, just maybe they will think twice before dealing.

We need to take trash like this and send them as a group into a gas chamber and kill them, where they cannot hurt or terrorize anyone, nor cost the taxpayers anymore money. These aren't human beings....they aren't even animals. They are less than animals. They contribute nothing to society, and as such, should be euthanized.

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About Peter Hermann
Peter Hermann started covering news for The Baltimore Sun in 1990, first in Anne Arundel County and, starting in 1994, reporting on the Baltimore Police Department. In 2001, he was assigned to Jerusalem as the Baltimore Sun's Middle East correspondent. He returned in 2005 as an assistant city editor overseeing crime coverage. In 2008, Peter returned to the beat as a daily reporter and blogger. A recent BBC report featured him in a segment on the harsh realities of covering crime in Baltimore.

Coverage will focus on crime trends, problems in neighborhoods in the city and elsewhere, profiles of victims and police officers and try to offer readers a fresh perspective on one of the most vexing issues facing Baltimore and its future.



Contributing to this blog is Justin Fenton, who joined The Sun in 2005 and has covered the Baltimore City Police Department and the criminal justice system since 2008. His work includes an investigation into Cal Ripken Jr.’s minor league baseball stadium deal with his hometown of Aberdeen, a three-part series chronicling a ruthless con woman, coverage of the killing of five Amish children at a schoolhouse in Nickel Mines, Pa., and a job swap with a British crime reporter to explore differences in crime-fighting. A special report looking into how city police handle rape cases led to sweeping reforms that changed the way sexual assaults are investigated in Baltimore. He was recognized as the best reporter in Baltimore by the City Paper in 2010 and by Baltimore Magazine in 2011.
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