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December 6, 2011

Morning after pill without a prescription?

The Food and Drug Administration is considering a request by the manufacturers of the Plan B morning-after pill to sell the drug without a prescription, The Washington Post is reporting.

Plan B, which is used to prevent pregnancies, can now be bought from a pharmacy. But women must have a prescription or prove that they are at least 17 years-old. Anyone under age 17 must have a prescription.

The request has been endorsed by some doctors, health advocates and members of Congress, but also has critics.

The FDA has until Wednesday to respond to the request, according to the Post article.

What do you think? Should Plan B be sold over-the-counter? Let us know.

Plan B contains a high dose of a hormone found in birth control pills and can lower the risk of pregnancy by up to 89 percent if taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex.

Posted by Andrea Walker at 1:30 PM | | Comments (5)
        

Comments

This product should be available without a prescription.

Plan B should absolutely be available without prescription, and ideally it should be much cheaper. I am not encouraging unprotected sex to any degree but the fact is that it does happen and women need to have options when it does. Since a large majority of the country is firmly against abortion, this seems to be our one chance to fix the mistake we made the previous night before it turns into a real, life changing problem.

Plan B should be made available over the counter without prescription. It is a responsible way for women to prevent a pregnancy and thus reduce the need for abortion. In addition, it will provide the needed medicine when so many pharmacists refuse to dispense it.

This has been available for some time over the counter in the Uk, and it is free, we know that people are having unprotected sex we need to find ways to remove barriers that prevent women from protecting themselves from an unplanned pregnancy, this should be a no brainier.

Absolutely not.These pills are poison.Until a girl is eightteen,she is considered a child,and should be protected,from these drugs.

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About Picture of Health
Meredith CohnMeredith Cohn has been a reporter since 1991, covering everything from politics and airlines to the environment and medicine. A runner since junior high and a particular eater for almost as long, she tries to keep up on health and fitness trends. Her aim is to bring you the latest news and information from the local and national medical and wellness communities.

Andrea K. WalkerAndrea K. Walker knows it’s weird to some people, but she has a fascination with fitness, diseases, medicine and other health-related topics. She subscribes to a variety of health and fitness magazines and becomes easily engrossed in the latest research in health and science. An exercise fanatic, she’s probably tried just about every fitness activity there is. Her favorites are running, yoga and kickboxing. So it is probably fitting that she has been assigned to cover the business of healthcare and to become a regular contributor to this blog. Andrea has been at The Sun for nearly 10 years, covering manufacturing, retail , airlines and small and minority business. She looks forward to telling readers about the latest health news.
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