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September 15, 2008

Try making fun of my fridge now

New%20fridge.jpg

 

That was the subject line of the e-mail Gailor sent me this morning. Needless to say there was a photo attached to it. The photo to the left.

If you're a new reader, you may not know what this refers to, so please go back to this post (and even earlier if you're having a boring day at work). ...

All this, of course, is because of Gailor's Perfect Roommate, who loves nothing more than cooking gourmet meals for my daughter when she's not studying statistics. (Allison, not my daughter.)

Evanston has been feeling the effects of Ike, and apparently whenever there's a bad rainstorm, Allison's mom likes to make kimchi, so that's what the two of them had for dinner the other night.

It's the Mother of All Kimchis, filled with seafood and served with a side dish of sauteed spinach.

 

kimchi.jpg

 

Posted by Elizabeth Large at 8:04 PM | | Comments (37)
        

Comments

Is that a bottle of rosé in the fridge? And who refrigerates peaches or nectarines?

WOW! That's a 'fridge to be proud of.

I absolutely love kimchee (the deeper the better!). I made a few batches myself a couple of years ago (easier and more forgiving than making sauerkraut), and love the way the taste and texture develop over a couple of weeks time. With the amount that they crank out on weekends at H-Mart and Lotte Plaza, I should have figured it wasn't just used as a side.

Can you get your techies to work up an aroma feature on this blog?

That must be a ringer fridge. I can't see any beer.

What are to purple cucumber-looking things on the bottom shelf?

That must be a ringer fridge. I can't see any beer. Always taking the high road; that's the Sandbox.

That must be a ringer fridge. I can't see any beer.

Red wine doesn't need to live in the fridge.

"That must be a ringer fridge. I can't see any beer.

Red wine doesn't need to live in the fridge."

Neither does bourbon, which is the appropriate drink for all business.

You go Gailorgirl! (cut it with some water if it will be a long night)

I love you Bourbon Girl. I will help you restore the House of Bourbon to its rightful place as the monarchy of France. Boo to democracy. Democracy bites.

Lissa -- in L.A., there was Miller Lite in the fridge, so the absence of that swill in the Evanston fridge is actually an improvement.

The amazing thing is that of those few things, the beer and soda were leftovers from some party (as far as I know she doesn't drink either one) and the jam was for me. She doesn't eat jam either. EL

That seals it: EL, I am moving back to the Midwest to woo Gailor if only to gain the glories of Allison's artistry.

Be afraid. Be very afraid.

Bucky - those look like Japanese eggplant - wonderful roasted (but, then, aren't all veggies wonderful roasted)

Joyce - I thought eggplant was dark purple. Not that I really know because I don't believe I've ever eaten eggplant.

There is also a white-skinned (albino?) version of this eggplant. both colors stir-fry nicely.

I'm with you on the roasted vegetables, sister Rosebud. Your nephew who hates broccoli will even eat that if I roast it and serve it with lemon juice and minced garlic.

Bucky--you need to come on out here and my husband will grill you some eggplant. We'll convert you!

Dahlink - I don't know that I need converting. It's just one of those things...my mother never cooked...baked...roasted...whatever...eggplant. My wife never has, either (and so far as I know her family never ate it.) As a matter of fact, I don't even remember ever seeing it in the grocery store...probably it just has never been on my radar screen.

I think the only reason I know what color it is, is because a lot of stuff in Land's End catalog is "eggplant" color.

Bucky, in the more upscale catalogs it's called "Aubergine." And it's delicious. My husband's grilled vegetable specialty is grilled eggplant rounds, cooked just until the texture is almost melting, topped with fresh lemon juice and capers. We eat it often!

My husband's grilled vegetable specialty is grilled eggplant rounds, cooked just until the texture is almost melting, topped with fresh lemon juice and capers.
Oh, that sounds so good! When's the brother-in-law going to make some for me?

Are those Tomatoes in the Fridge? Tisk Tisk.

Rosebud, stay tuned!

Dahlink wrote: in the more upscale catalogs it's called "Aubergine."

Further research reveals that "aubergine" is not only another name for the color, but also another name for the fruit itself.

And even further research reveals that the aubergine/eggplant is closely related to tobacco.

This is a pretty interesting cultivar.

Further research reveals that "aubergine" is not only another name for the color, but also another name for the fruit itself.

Yes, it's the French word for eggplant.

Or eggplant is the American word for aubergine.

"Or eggplant is the American word for aubergine." British hottie food show extraordinaire, Nigella Lawson refers to eggplants as aubergines also. I think "American" is a good descriptive word here, Hal; because I think we may be the only people who do call it "eggplant".


Bucky write: a lot of stuff in Land's End catalog is "eggplant" color.

Dahlink wrote: in the more upscale catalogs it's called "Aubergine."

And at Wal-Mart, it's called "Purple".

I never understood how eggplant got its name until I saw some small white ones.

Eggplant is a stupid name for that thing. What is eggy about it? Grapefruit is also a terrible name.

All things eggplant:

http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-egg1.htm
[Q] From Thomas Casey: “Why do we call the eggplant by that name?”

[A] This curious comestible (actually a fruit, but eaten as a vegetable) probably has more names in varieties of the English language than any other. That’s because it has been cultivated for a very long time and it has been widely transmitted across the world from its heartland in eastern and southern Asia (the Arabs introduced it to Spain from India as early as the eighth century AD, and the Persians took it to Africa).

The name of eggplant was given it by Europeans in the middle of the eighteenth century because the variety they knew had fruits that were the shape and size of goose eggs. That variety also had fruits that are a whitish or yellowish colour rather than the wine purple that is more familiar to us nowadays. So the sort they knew really did look as though it had fruits like eggs.

In Britain, it is usually called an aubergine, a name which was borrowed through French and Catalan from its Arabic name al-badinjan. That word had reached Arabic through Persian from the Sanskrit vatimgana, which indicates how long it has been cultivated in India. In India, it has in the past been called brinjal, a word which comes from the same Arabic source as British aubergine, but filtered through Portuguese (the current term among English speakers in India is either the Hindi baingan, or aubergine). Some people in the southern states of the US still know it as Guinea squash, a name that commemorates its having been brought there from West Africa in the eighteenth century.

Upon reflection, I think I've probably never eaten eggplant because of its name. I don't eat eggs and that bias probably ttransferred to this fruit.

If it had been called aubergine, I probably would have tried it at some point.

And, hmpstd, good one with the Wal-Mart comment.

Enough about eggplants Owl Meat. Did you forget that today is Thursday? Perhaps a picture of you riding a zebra as a tot? Or is Bourbon Girl your Yoko? Don't ruin Thursday Fun Yoko! You're killing independent Owl Meat.

One of the more interestingly-named eggplant dishes I ran across in Turkey was İmam Bayıldı (pronounced "Eemam Bayuhlduh), which translates as "The Imam fainted." The reason, as I heard, was either because of the wonderful taste (true), or the large amount of expensive olive oil required (One recipe I have calls for one cup of olive oil).

The pictured frig is Gailor's frig, much like the mini bar in better hotels: someone else stocks it and all you have to do is throw money at it. ; )

Admit it, nobody really likes eggplant.

RevEd -- Perhaps a picture of you riding a zebra as a tot?

Now's there's a pic I'd love to see. : )

Not true, OMG--I loved eggplant even when a small tike and my mother used to make her own version of eggplant parmigiana.

I dunno Dahlink, I thought of that too (eggplant parm) but honestly it's got the breading and the cheese and the sauce... I don't think I actually like plain ole unadorned eggplant - much less ever had it...

Well, Joyce W., you may be right about unadorned eggplant. It's sort of like tofu in that it takes on the flavors of what you cook it with.

Oh OMG, lots of people like eggplant! I first tried it at the old Horn & Horn on Baltimore Street; it was sliced very thin and fried crisp--WONderful!! I introduced my husband to eggplant in the forms of eggplant parm and ratatouille, and he likes both dishes a lot. Of course, THE best fried eggplant was at Haussner's! (Sigh...yet another reason to miss the place.)

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About this blog
Richard Gorelick was appointed The Baltimore Sun's restaurant critic in September 2010. Before joining the paper staff fulltime, he contributed freelance criticism and features articles about food to area and regional publications. Along the way, he dispatched for short-distance trucking companies, shilled for cultural non-profits, and assisted in cognitive neurology research – never the subject, always the control.

He takes restaurants seriously but not himself, and his favorite restaurant is the one you love, too.
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